• The Real Ghostbusters

    (1986)

    The Real Ghostbusters is an American animated television series spun-off from the Ghostbusters franchise. The series ran from 1986 to 1991, and was produced by Columbia Pictures Television, DiC Enterprises, and Coca-Cola Telecommunications. “The Real” was added to the title after a dispute with Filmation and its Ghost Busters properties. The series continues the adventures of paranormal investigators Dr. Peter Venkman, Dr. Egon Spengler, Dr. Ray Stantz, Winston Zeddemore, their secretary Janine Melnitz and their mascot ghost Slimer.

    There also were two ongoing Real Ghostbusters comics, one published monthly by Now Comics in USA and the other published weekly by Marvel Comics in the United Kingdom, and a popular toy line manufactured by Kenner.

  • The Spooktacular New Adventures of Casper

    (1996)

    The Spooktacular New Adventures of Casper is an animated television spin-off of the feature film Casper, which, in turn, was based on the Harvey Comics character of Casper the Friendly Ghost.

  • The Tom & Jerry Kids Show

    (1990)

    The Tom & Jerry Kids Show is an animated television series, co-produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions and Turner Entertainment, starring cat-and-mouse duo Tom and Jerry as children. The show premiered in 1990 and continued airing until 1994. The series is about Tom Cat and Jerry Mouse in their childhood and their friends Droopy and Dripple and Spike and Tyke. It began airing as the first program of the Fox Broadcasting Company’s children’s block, Fox Kids on September 8, 1990.

    The series is somewhat similar to the “older” version of the original 1940-58 theatricals, partly akin to being produced by creators William Hanna and Joseph Barbera. In terms of violence level, they are far closer to the classic cartoons than previous television adaptions such as Filmation’s The Tom and Jerry Comedy Show although somewhat milder than Hanna and Barbera’s original series. Part of it is similar to Pink Panther and Pals and Garfield and Friends. Droopy and Dripple went on to star in their own short-lived spin-off Droopy, Master Detective.

  • The Powerpuff Girls

    (1998)

    The Powerpuff Girls is an American animated television series created by animator Craig McCracken and produced by Cartoon Network Studios for Cartoon Network. The show centers on Blossom, Bubbles, and Buttercup, three kindergarten-aged girls with superpowers, as well as their “father”, the brainy scientist Professor Utonium, who all live in the fictional city of Townsville, USA. The girls are frequently called upon by the town’s childlike and naive mayor to help fight nearby criminals using their powers.

    McCracken originally developed the show in 1992 as a cartoon short entitled Whoopass Stew! while in his second year at CalArts. Following a name change, Cartoon Network featured the first Powerpuff Girls pilots in its animation showcase program World Premiere Toons in 1995 and 1996. The series made its official debut as a Cartoon Cartoon on November 18, 1998, with the final episode airing on March 25, 2005. A total of 78 episodes were aired in addition to two shorts, a Christmas special, a feature film, and a tenth anniversary special. Additionally, the series has been nominated for six Emmy Awards, nine Annie Awards, and a Kids’ Choice Award during its run. Spin-off media include an anime, three CD soundtracks, a home video collection, and a series of video games, as well as various licensed merchandise. The series has received generally positive reception and won four awards.

  • The Tracey Ullman Show

    (1987)

    The Tracey Ullman Show is an American television variety show, hosted by British-born comedian and onetime pop singer Tracey Ullman. It debuted on April 5, 1987 as the Fox network’s second primetime series after Married… with Children, and ran until May 26, 1990. The show is produced by Gracie Films and 20th Century Fox Television. The show blended sketch comedy shorts with many musical numbers, featuring choreography by Paula Abdul. The show also produced The Simpsons shorts before it spun off into its own show, which was also produced by Gracie Films and 20th Century Fox Television.

  • ThunderCats

    (1985)

    ThunderCats is an American animated television series that was produced by Rankin/Bass Productions debuting in 1985, based on the characters created by Tobin “Ted” Wolf. The series, for which Leonard Starr was the head writer, follows the adventures of a group of cat-like humanoid aliens. The animation was provided by Japanese animation company Pacific Animation Corporation whose artists later went on to join Studio Ghibli. Season 1 of the show aired in 1985, followed by a TV movie entitled ThunderCats – HO! in 1986. Seasons 2, 3, and 4 followed a new format of twenty episodes each, starting with a five-part story.

    The series was originally distributed by Rankin-Bass Productions’ then-parent company Telepictures Corporation, which would later merge with Lorimar Productions in 1986. In 1989, Lorimar-Telepictures was purchased by and folded into Warner Bros., whose television syndication arm would eventually assume distribution of the show; Warner Bros. have had the rights to the series from that point on.

    There were also several comic book series produced: Marvel Comics’ version, 1984 to 1988; and five series by Wildstorm, an imprint of DC Comics, beginning in 2003. Items of clothing featuring the ThunderCats logo and DVD boxsets of the original series have enjoyed a resurgence in recent years as nostalgia for the former children’s favorite has grown.

  • TaleSpin

    (1992)

    TaleSpin is a half-hour Animated Adventure series based in the fictional city of Cape Suzette, that first aired in 1990 as part of The Disney Afternoon, with characters adapted from Disney’s 1967 animated feature The Jungle Book, which was theatrically rereleased in the summer before this show premiered in the fall. The name of the show is a play on “tailspin,” the rapid descent of an aircraft in a steep spiral. The two words in the show’s name, tale and spin, are a way to describe telling a story. The show is one of the nine Disney Afternoon shows to use established Disney characters as the main characters, with the others being Darkwing Duck, DuckTales, Chip ‘n Dale Rescue Rangers, Goof Troop, Bonkers, Quack Pack, Aladdin and The Lion King’s Timon and Pumbaa.

  • The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest

    (1996)

    The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest is an American animated action-adventure television series produced by Hanna-Barbera and broadcast on Cartoon Network from August 26, 1996 to September 24, 1999. A revival of the 1960s Jonny Quest franchise, it features teenage adventurers Jonny Quest, Hadji Singh, and Jessie Bannon as they accompanied Dr. Benton Quest and bodyguard Race Bannon to investigate strange phenomena, legends, and mysteries in exotic locales. Action also takes place in the virtual realm of QuestWorld, a three-dimensional cyberspace domain rendered with computer animation.

    Conceived in the early 1990s, Real Adventures suffered a long and troubled development. Hanna-Barbera dismissed creator Peter Lawrence in 1996 and hired new producers to finish the show. John Eng and Cosmo Anzilotti completed Lawrence’s work; David Lipman, Davis Doi, and Larry Houston wrote new episodes with reworked character designs akin to those of classic Quest. Each team produced half of the show’s fifty-two episodes. While Lawrence’s team crafted stories of real-world mystery and exploration, later writers used science fiction and paranormal plots.

    Turner Entertainment supported the show through a massive marketing campaign with thirty-three licensees. Real Adventures debuted with an unprecedented wide release on Cartoon Network, TBS, and TNT, airing twenty-one times per week. Critics have debated the merits of the show’s animation, writing, and spirit compared to classic Quest, but it has also received praise in those categories. Real Adventures failed to gain high ratings with its targeted demographics and its merchandise performed poorly, leading to cancellation after fifty-two episodes. Turner has released eight VHS, two laserdisc, and twenty-six DVD episodes; reruns have appeared on Toonami, CNX, and other Cartoon Network formats.

  • Thomas & Friends

    (1984)

    Thomas & Friends is a British children’s television series, which had its first broadcast on the ITV network on 4 September 1984. It is based on The Railway Series of books by the Reverend Wilbert Awdry and his son, Christopher Awdry. These books deal with the adventures of a group of anthropomorphised locomotives and road vehicles who live on the fictional Island of Sodor. The books were based on stories Wilbert told to entertain his son, Christopher during his recovery from measles. From Series one to four, many of the stories are based on events from Awdry’s personal experience.

  • The Simpsons

    (1989)

    The Simpsons is an American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Broadcasting Company. The series is a satirical parody of a middle class American lifestyle epitomized by its family of the same name, which consists of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. The show is set in the fictional town of Springfield and parodies American culture, society, television, and many aspects of the human condition.