• Gintama

    (2006)

    Life isn’t easy in feudal Japan… especially since the aliens landed and conquered everything! Oh sure, the new health care is great, but the public ban on the use of swords has left a lot of defeated samurai with a difficult decision to make concerning their future career paths! This is especially true if, as in the case of Gintoki Sakata, they’re not particularly inclined towards holding a day job, which is why Gintoki’s opted for the freelance route, taking any job that’s offered to him as long as the financial remuneration sounds right. Unfortunately, in a brave new world filled with stray bug-eyed monsters, upwardly mobile Yakuza and overly ambitious E.T. entrepreneurs, those jobs usually don’t pay as well as they should for the pain, suffering and indignities endured!

  • Bleach

    (2004)

    Bleach is an action-anime series. The show revolves around Ichigo Kurosaki, a goodhearted 15 year old high-school student who carries the undesired ability to see spirits. Others in his family (two sisters and his father) carry this ability to some extent as well. One evening, he encounters Rukia Kuchiki; a Shinigami, or Death God. It is her job to usher lost spirits to Soul Society, and to also eliminate those which cross over from the Hollow World.

  • Wizards of Waverly Place

    (2007)

    Wizards of Waverly Place is an American supernatural fantasy teen sitcom which ran from October 12, 2007 to January 6, 2012 on Disney Channel. The series was created by Todd J. Greenwald, and stars Selena Gomez, David Henrie and Jake T. Austin as three wizard siblings with magical abilities competing to win sole custody of the family powers. Further main cast includes Jennifer Stone, María Canals Barrera and David DeLuise.

    The series won “Outstanding Children’s Program” at the 61st Primetime Emmy Awards in 2009. A film adaptation of the series, Wizards of Waverly Place: The Movie, premiered as a Disney Channel Original Movie on August 28, 2009. The film adaptation won “Outstanding Children’s Program” at the 62nd Primetime Emmy Awards earning the series its second consecutive Emmy. The farewell season won “Outstanding Children’s Program” at the 64th Primetime Emmy Awards bringing the franchise’s total to three Emmy awards. Wizards of Waverly Place ended as the longest-running Disney Channel Original Series with 106 episodes over four seasons. Its series finale averaged nearly 10 million viewers, which made that episode the most-watched series finale in Disney Channel’s history.

  • Joan of Arcadia

    (2003)

    Joan of Arcadia is an American television fantasy/family drama telling the story of teenager Joan Girardi, who sees and speaks with God and performs tasks she is given. The series originally aired on Fridays, 8–9 p.m. on CBS and CTV for two seasons, from September 26, 2003 until April 22, 2005.

    On initial release, the show was praised by critics and won the prestigious Humanitas Prize and the People’s Choice Award. It became one of the few television shows to be nominated for an Emmy Award in its first season for Outstanding Drama Series. The title alludes to Joan of Arc and the show takes place in fictional Arcadia, Maryland.

  • Danny Phantom

    (2004)

    Danny Phantom is an American animated television series created by Butch Hartman for Nickelodeon, produced by Billionfold Studios. It was distributed by Nelvana, a Canadian animation company, as was The Fairly OddParents.

    The show is about a 14-year-old named Danny Fenton who, after an accident with an unpredictable portal between the human world and the supernatural “Ghost Zone”, becomes half-ghost and frequently saves his town and the world from ghost attacks, while attempting to keep his ghost half a secret from everyone, except his best friends Tucker Foley and Samantha Manson.

    The series premiered on April 3, 2004 and ended on August 24, 2007; it ran for 3 seasons with a total of 53 episodes. It is currently being released on DVD.

    On August 5, 2013, Hartman announced the possible revival of the show as a result of persisted praise from fans and successful T.U.F.F. Puppy ratings on his Twitter account, but there has been not yet been any official word from Hartman or Nickelodeon.

  • What Lives Inside

    (2015)

    While mourning the loss of his world-famous puppeteer father, Taylor finds himself mysteriously transported to the magical world of his father’s show.

  • Stargate Atlantis

    (2004)

    Stargate Atlantis is a Canadian-American adventure and military science fiction television series and part of MGM’s Stargate franchise. The show was created by Brad Wright and Robert C. Cooper as a spin-off series of Stargate SG-1, which was created by Wright and Jonathan Glassner and was itself based on the feature film Stargate. All five seasons of Stargate Atlantis were broadcast by the Sci-Fi Channel in the United States and The Movie Network in Canada. The show premiered on July 16, 2004; its final episode aired on January 9, 2009. The series was filmed in and around Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

    The story of Stargate Atlantis follows the events of Stargate SG-1’s seventh season finale episode “Lost City” and eighth season premiere episode “New Order”, in which the cast of that series discovered an Antarctic outpost created by the alien race known as the Ancients. In the pilot episode “Rising”, Stargate Command sends an international team to investigate the outpost, where Dr. Daniel Jackson discovers the location of Atlantis, the legendary city created by the Ancients, and Colonel Jack O’Neill visits the outpost after having been put in stasis and retrieved from it.

  • Dead Like Me

    (2003)

    Dead Like Me is an American comedy-drama television series starring Ellen Muth and Mandy Patinkin as grim reapers who reside and work in Seattle, Washington.

    Eighteen-year-old Georgia “George” Lass is the show’s protagonist and narrator. George dies early in the pilot episode and becomes one of the “undead”, a “grim reaper”. George soon learns that a reaper’s job is to remove the souls of people, preferably just before they die, and escort them until they move on into their afterlife. George’s death leaves behind her mother and the rest of her family at a point when her relationships with them were on shaky ground.

  • Eureka

    (2006)

    Eureka is an American science fiction television series that premiered on Syfy on July 18, 2006. The fifth and final season ended on July 16, 2012. The show is set in a fictional town in Oregon called Eureka. Although in the pilot Eureka was located in Washington State. Inhabited almost entirely by scientific geniuses, most residents of Eureka work for Global Dynamics—an advanced research facility responsible for the development of nearly all major technological breakthroughs since its inception. Each episode features a mysterious accidental or intentional misuse of technology, which the town sheriff, Jack Carter, then solves with the help of town scientists. Each season also features a larger story arc that concerns a particular major event or item.

    The series was created by Andrew Cosby and Jaime Paglia and was produced by Universal Media Studios. While initially lacking in critical acclaim, Eureka was a ratings success for the network, averaging 3.2 million viewers during the second half of season three. In 2007, Eureka was nominated for the Emmy Award for Outstanding Visual Effects for a Series, and won the Leo Award for Best Visual Effects in a Dramatic Series. In the United Kingdom the show airs on Syfy and is known as A Town Called Eureka, although it is also shown under its original name on the BT Vision platform.

  • The Prisoner (2009)

    (2009)

    A man, known as 6, finds himself inexplicably trapped in The Village with no memory of how he arrived. As he explores his environment, he discovers that his fellow inhabitants are identified by numbers instead of names, have no memory of any prior existence, and are under constant surveillance. Not knowing whom to trust, 6 is driven by the need to discover the truth behind The Village, the reason for his being there, and most importantly – how he can escape.